Links

Drugging the Environment | The Scientist Magazine®

43615-1-mHumans have spiked ecosystems with a flood of active pharmaceuticals. The drugs are feminizing male fish, confusing birds, and worrying scientists.

The environment is being bombarded with active pharmaceuticals that pass through our bodies, in many cases unchanged. The accumulation of these substances is having unforeseen consequences could be potentially devastating to the environment and wildlife. Continue reading Drugging the Environment | The Scientist Magazine®

Programming DNA to Reverse Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria

42-61175477

At its annual assembly in Geneva, the World Health Organization approved a radical and far-reaching plan to slow the rapid, extensive spread of antibiotic resistance around the world. The plan hopes to curb the rise caused by an unchecked use of antibiotics and lack of new antibiotics on the market. Continue reading Programming DNA to Reverse Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria

Video games probably don’t contribute to developing Alzheimer’s

borderlands 2

A new study seems to suggest that playing certain types of video games, specifically first person shooters like Borderlands, Dead Island, Fallout 3 etc maybe be altering players brains in a way that may ultimately make them more susceptible to Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases. Continue reading Video games probably don’t contribute to developing Alzheimer’s

Activity of thousands of genes differs from winter to summer | University of Cambridge

gene expression seasonal

Our immune systems vary with the seasons, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge that could help explain why certain conditions such as heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis are aggravated in winter whilst people tend to be healthier in the summer. Continue reading Activity of thousands of genes differs from winter to summer | University of Cambridge

Ease of weight loss influenced by individual biology

NIH study finds varied responses to calorie restriction in obese adults. For the first time in a lab, researchers at the National Institutes of Health found evidence supporting the commonly held belief that people with certain physiologies lose less weight than others when limiting calories. Study results published May 11 in Diabetes.

Source: Ease of weight loss influenced by individual biology