All posts by Geoff Morris

When Radiation Isn’t the Real Risk – The New York Times

It’s been more than 4 years since the Fukushima incident occurred and not a single person has died or become sick through radiation, and likely never will. Though 1600 died from the stress of the evacuation itself. Continue reading When Radiation Isn’t the Real Risk – The New York Times

Drugging the Environment | The Scientist Magazine®

43615-1-mHumans have spiked ecosystems with a flood of active pharmaceuticals. The drugs are feminizing male fish, confusing birds, and worrying scientists.

The environment is being bombarded with active pharmaceuticals that pass through our bodies, in many cases unchanged. The accumulation of these substances is having unforeseen consequences could be potentially devastating to the environment and wildlife. Continue reading Drugging the Environment | The Scientist Magazine®

Programming DNA to Reverse Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria

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At its annual assembly in Geneva, the World Health Organization approved a radical and far-reaching plan to slow the rapid, extensive spread of antibiotic resistance around the world. The plan hopes to curb the rise caused by an unchecked use of antibiotics and lack of new antibiotics on the market. Continue reading Programming DNA to Reverse Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria

Learning How to Learn

A fascinating and useful talk by Engineering professor Barbara Oakley on the subject of learning how to learn.

For more information check out her Coursera course Learning How to Learn: Powerful mental tools to help you master tough subjects

Epigenome maps of the human body’s major organs

Salk scientists reveal epigenome maps of the human body’s major organs. This new atlas of human organ epigenomes provides a starting place to understand the role of chemical markers in development, health and disease Continue reading Epigenome maps of the human body’s major organs

Health Check: can your brain be ‘full’?

The brain is truly a marvel. A seemingly endless library, whose shelves house our most precious memories as well as our lifetime’s knowledge. But is there a point where it reaches capacity? In other words, can the brain be “full”?

The answer is a resounding no, because, well, brains are more sophisticated than that. A study published in Nature Neuroscience earlier this year shows that instead of just crowding in, old information is sometimes pushed out of the brain for new memories to form. Continue reading Health Check: can your brain be ‘full’?

Link between proteins points to future Alzheimer’s treatments – University of Cambridge

Researchers have identified how proteins that play a key role in Alzheimer’s disease are linked in a pathway that controls its progression, and that drugs targeting this pathway may be a potential new way of treating the disease.

Continue reading Link between proteins points to future Alzheimer’s treatments – University of Cambridge

Microbiome: Microbial mystery – Nature

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It seems that gut bacteria play an important but poorly understand role in the development of colorectal cancer. Teasing apart the contributing factors could pave the way to cheaper, better and more effective treatments and maybe help even shed light on how to prevent it entirely. Continue reading Microbiome: Microbial mystery – Nature

Alzheimer’s origins tied to rise of human intelligence

Modern humans emerged about 200,000 years ago.Alzheimer’s disease may have evolved alongside human intelligence, researchers report in a paper posted this month on BioRxiv1. Continue reading Alzheimer’s origins tied to rise of human intelligence

The Only Man Ever Cured of AIDS – The Scientist Magazine

Timothy Ray Brown has gone from medical marvel to HIV/AIDS activist, spreading the hope that researchers can eventually develop a cure for the disease. Continue reading The Only Man Ever Cured of AIDS – The Scientist Magazine